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Colonial Afterlives

Colonial Afterlives brings contemporary responses to the complex legacies of British occupation from sixteen outstanding artists living in Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, Canada and Britain, including Tasmanian artists Julie Gough, James Newitt, Yvonne Rees-Pagh, Geoff Parr and Michael Schlitz.

The exhibition incorporates diverse views that range from melancholic eulogies to passionate and, at times, scathing commentaries on the complex legacies of British occupation. While the artists are all finely attuned to the histories and politics of their own region, the exhibition reveals profound and sometimes surprising connections. Ultimately, it raises larger questions around the nature of post-colonial identity in an increasingly globalised world.

Curator: Dr Sarah Thomas

 

Presented by Salamanca Arts Centre

 

Supported by Arts Tasmania, Australia Council for the Arts, City of Hobart and Contemporary Art Tasmania

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TICKETS

Free events

DURATION

Thu 19 March – Mon 27 April

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

FLOOR TALK

Sat 21 March, 12.30pm

DATES

Hobart

Salamanca Arts Centre

Thu 19 Mar 2015, until Mon 27 Apr 2015,

Colonial Afterlives brings contemporary responses to the complex legacies of British occupation from sixteen outstanding artists living in Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, Canada and Britain, including Tasmanian artists Julie Gough, James Newitt, Yvonne Rees-Pagh, Geoff Parr and Michael Schlitz.

The exhibition incorporates diverse views that range from melancholic eulogies to passionate and, at times, scathing commentaries on the complex legacies of British occupation. While the artists are all finely attuned to the histories and politics of their own region, the exhibition reveals profound and sometimes surprising connections. Ultimately, it raises larger questions around the nature of post-colonial identity in an increasingly globalised world.

Curator: Dr Sarah Thomas

 

Presented by Salamanca Arts Centre

 

Supported by Arts Tasmania, Australia Council for the Arts, City of Hobart and Contemporary Art Tasmania

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dirtsong

dirtsong

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28 March
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Change can be challenging. It requires us to shift expectations and find new solutions. Change can also bring renewal, the…

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